High quality healthcare commissioning: Obstacles and opportunities for progress on race equality

High quality healthcare commissioning: Obstacles and opportunities for progress on race equality is a
paper from Better Health that describes typical elements of commissioning work and points out a range of actions that clinical commissioners, commissioning managers and other stakeholders can and should take to improve healthcare commissioning for multi-ethnic populations.

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BS 11000 for health commissioning: Lessons from history for managing the commissioning relationship

An article in Clinical Governance: An International Journal suggesting that using BS 11000 will be beneficial for commissioning organisations in that it reduces the risk of assuming business relationships are based on a simple contractual relationship. It uses case studies to illustrate that a richer more collaborative business relationship is required for effective provision of services. The authors suggest that BS 11000 can help organisations put in place the foundations of such relationships.

Ask your local health librarian to get hold of:

Quayle, A., Ashworth, D. & Gillies, A., 2013. BS 11000 for health commissioning: Lessons from history for managing the commissioning relationship. Clinical Governance: An International Journal, 18(1), pp.18–29. Available at: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/14777271311297920 [Accessed June 3, 2013].

Cost-effective Commissioning For Continence Care

Cost-effective Commissioning For Continence Care is a guide written by continence professionals for the All Party Parliamentary Group For Continence Care.  It outlines the essential elements needed during each phase of the commissioning cycle.

Continence care pathways are only effectively delivered through an integrated continence service that is clinically-driven, patient-sensitive and treatment-focused.  They offer cost savings by reducing:

  • unnecessary catheterisations and associated urinary tract infections (UTI)
  • pressure ulcers linked to poor continence care
  • acute hospitalisations for UTI, urinary retention, renal failure and faecal impaction
  • care home admissions precipitated by incontinence
  • the use of incontinence products through low-cost interventions such as bladder retraining, pelvic floor muscle
  • training and the appropriate use of medications for incontinence

Evidence based commissioning: calculating shift potentials for paediatric services

Study  that finds that large sums are currently being spent on inappropriate treatment of routine childhood conditions, especially in large urban conurbations. It demonstrates that in the case studies, the alternative provision can provide a viable and cost effective alternative.

Ask your local health librarian to get hold of:

Barnes, K., Longfield, P., Jones, K., Littlemore, G., McDonough, C., McIntyre, A., Robertson, A., Turton, N., Urdhin, K. and McLaughlin, M.  (2013) “Evidence based commissioning: calculating shift potentials for paediatric services”. Clinical Governance: An International Journal, 18 (1) pp.39 – 48.

Lessons for health care from decommissioning care home services

Drawing on local knowledge and best practice examples, this article highlights lessons and themes identified by those decommissioning care home services. The authors believe that such lessons are relevant to those making disinvestment decisions across public sector services, including health-care.

Ask your local health librarian to get hold of:

Robinson, S.,  Glasby, J. and Allen, K. (2013) ‘It ain’t what you do it’s the way that you do it’: lessons for health care from decommissioning of older people’s services. Health and Social Care in the Community http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12046

#NHSAlliance2012: Michael Dixon and Barbara Hakin

After a courteous and appropriately geological welcome from Dorset CCG, and under the chairmanship of Chris Ham, the first plenary at the NHS Alliance's 2012 conference saw Dr Michael Dixon, Chair of the Alliance, deliver an exciting and challenging statement of where we are now and where we need to be. We have won a fifteen-year campaign for clinical commissioning, which will happen from April 2013, he said, but the forces of reaction and centralism will not give up power without a fight. What we need now is less a National Health Service, more a National Health System or a National Health Partnership.

Dame Barbara Hakin of the NHS Commissioning Board gave a tour d'horizon of the present situation. CCGs were reporting back that authorisation has been a helpful exercise. We are now ninety working days away from the new system

For detailed accounts, we and others are tweeting at the hashtag #NHSAlliance2012. Follow it for minute by minute updates.